Glossary

Type has a wealth of terminology. It is a lexicon that is simultaneously precise and confusing. I started to keep a list of typographic elements when I come across them. I have attempted to reference:

General

Cross Head
Heading that is centrally aligned. Also described in terms of weight: Main, Heavy, Medium and Light
Subhead
According to Bringhurst in marketing copy… levels of subheads are given letters… A-heads, B-head, C-heads, and so on.
Side Head
Heading that is left aligned. Can also be indented and run-in where the heading is within the text block like a drop cap

Books

Title
What the thing is called
Subtitle
Optional, sometimes an expansion of the title
Colophon
Summit or finishing touch, details of the books manufacture. Describes production notes; also include printers mark or logotype
Folio
Page number but also date, volume, errata
Front Matter
Stuff at the front. Also Preliminaries
End Matter
Stuff at the back e.g. Colophon, index, appendix. Also Back Matter
Synopsis
Summary of book
Bio
About the author
Verso
Contents of the Back cover of a book
Quote
Block quote, extract
Ad card
Also by section of a book at the front, i.e. other things the author has written
Part title and number
Section of a book that groups chapters together
Chapter title and number
Self explantory
Opener text
Lead
Frontmatter head
A heading specifically in the contents and introduction of a book
Folio
Page numbers
Running Head
Two types Verso which states the book title, and Recto which states the chapter
Extract
A block quote
Endpapers
Pages at the front and back of book that bind the cover to the book pages
Backmatter head
Heading in the backmatter section of a book
Footnote
Note at bottom of a page
Endnote
Note at the end of a chapter
Sidenote
Note in the outer margins of a page

Newspapers and magazines

Masthead
The name of a newspaper or magazine that is printed at the top of the front page; also Nameplate; Formal statement of newspaper’s name, officers, place of publication and other descriptive information, usually on the editorial page
Stub
Some details but not all
Jump line
A link!
Billboard
Hammer headline. Like the poster, a single attention grabbing sentence
Kicker
Word or short phrase usually set above a headline. A visual signpost, indicate a category
Headline
Title, but also attention grabbing. Typically set very large
Deck
Text between headline and body of article; a summary or tl;dr. A form of visual signpost. Also Deck Copy, Bank or Dek
Byline
Name and position of the writer, along with date. As in by name
Standfirst
Introductory text to set scene or summary of article

Web specific

Breadcrumb
A trail of links to show where you are
tl;dr
too long didn’t read. A Summary

Text

Display
To grab attention. Headings
Reference
Small, discrete chunks of text. Glossaries, tables
Linear/Reading
Body text. Continuous reading. News article, product description